KITCHEN SINKOLOGY: MASTER CLASS – UPGRADING YOUR SINK

It’s finally happened! You’ve decided to upgrade your countertops and have picked out a beautiful quartz (or granite… or…) and you can’t wait to have it installed. But what about the sink? There are a number of things to consider when choosing your sink. How big do you want it to be? What material should it be made of (there are more options than just stainless steel) and what style is best for your space? Wonder no more! We’ve compiled the ultimate guide to the kitchen sink in a single post and we’re happy to share from our expertise.

upgrading your sink

The first question you should ask yourself is: “How do I use my sink?”. This will help determine the best size and shape. A single bowl sink can offer a larger area to work with, while double sinks give you the flexibility to use each bowl separately for different purposes. If you regularly hand-wash dishes, a double sink gives you space to wash and rinse, but if you prefer to use your dishwasher, a single sink might give you options you can’t get with smaller bowls.

The first question you should ask yourself is: “How do I use my sink?”. This will help determine the best size and shape. A single bowl sink can offer a larger area to work with, while double sinks give you the flexibility to use each bowl separately for different purposes. If you regularly hand-wash dishes, a double sink gives you space to wash and rinse, but if you prefer to use your dishwasher, a single sink might give you options you can’t get with smaller bowls.

Sinks come in a number of different styles, but they are most commonly found in three main categories: Drop-in (or “Topmount”), Undermount, and Apron Front (or “Farmhouse”). Each style has it’s own benefits and drawbacks, and it’s good know all the facts to make an informed decision.

upgrading kitchen sink

Most commonly made of stainless steel, Drop-in sinks were the standard sink for decades and is likely the type we’ve all grown up with. A hole is cut into the custom countertop and the sink is dropped in from the top, with a lip covering the cut edge. Having a ridge around your sink makes it a little more difficult to wipe spills and crumbs off your countertop, as bits can get hung up on the edge, but there are benefits to this type of sink too. Corners and cut edges of any type of countertop are the spots that are most susceptible to damage, and your sink is a heavily-used area of your kitchen. While stone is extremely durable, it’s still possible to chip corners. It’s easy to take for granted how often pots and dishes are moved in and out of sinks, and a drop-in sink protects that corner from any of our clumsiest moments.

kitchen sink upgrade

 

 

Just because they’ve generally the least expensive option, and been around a long time it doesn’t mean drop-in sinks haven’t evolved. There are lots of modern options available that offer plenty of style at budget-friendly prices.

Undermount Sinks have gained in popularity over the last number of years… and for good reason—they’re simply beautiful. Mounted with adhesive and clips from the bottom of the countertop, they offer a seamless transition from your solid stone countertop to your sink. Wiping spills and crumbs from your counter surface into the sink is effortless and they showcase stone countertops by providing an uninterrupted visual that highlights the weight and thickness of the stone.

undermount sink
undermount sink

While undermount sinks are widely available in stainless steel, granite sinks are gaining in popularity due to their variety and durability. Available in different earthy tones, granite sinks are made of quartz dust, are formed under pressure and fired into a non-porous, hygienic surface that is resistant to chips, scratches, stains and heat.

granite sinks

For a long time Apron-Front Sinks were known as “farmhouse sinks” because they were most commonly seen made of white enamel, similar to what you’d picture in a vintage farmhouse. These sinks are installed so that the front (apron) is visible. If you wanted to add one to a kitchen, apron-front sinks can’t be easily swapped with other styles and would require some cabinet alterations, but if you love the look, there’s just nothing that else that will do.

Apron-front sinks have come a long way from their humble beginnings and can be a stunning accent piece in your kitchen whether your style runs toward vintage farmhouse or sleek modern. Branching out from enamel, you can now find apron-front sinks made of different materials like stainless steel and granite, boasting patterned aprons like this one, and even in different colours (black sink anyone?).

apron front sinks

Once you’ve chosen the type and style of sink you want, there are a few important things to note if you’d like them installed with stone countertops:

If you are buying your sink from an online retailer or a big box store, many of them don’t come with the digital template files that we need to fabricate the countertop and make the cutout the exact size using the CNC. While we can make the cut required, we would need to have the sink dropped off to our shop prior to fabrication. This can add time and cost to your project, minimizing any savings you may have gotten by shopping around.

Secondly, each individual undermount sink manufacturer designates the size of the cut-out using different “reveals” that are not determined by us. They can be positive reveals, zero reveals or negative reveals. If you have a preference outside of what the manufacturer has designated, we can help, but we’d need to know in advance and you’d likely need to drop off your sink to us as well.

custom sinks and countertops

Hopefully we’ve helped your narrow down your choices, or offered some new and interesting ideas you hadn’t thought of. If you have any questions about sinks (or Solid Stone Countertops ) we’re always here to help!

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